Each year, KFW awards $200,000 in grants; $100,000 is given for each program. The following are the grants most recently awarded.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2019 grantees

AMA Grants

  • Ain’t I a Woman Theatre (Louisville): $5,000 to produce Ain’t I a Woman Playfest, a play festival highlighting the works of women playwrights of color. Participating playwrights will have a chance to see their work produced, and audience members will be able to attend free shows where a wide range of women’s experiences are represented.
  • Appalachian Arts Alliance, Inc. (Hazard): $4,000 to partner artists with students in local high schools to create art illuminating and elevating the experiences of marginalized folks in Eastern Kentucky. The program will give voice to young Appalachian women of color and promote a greater understanding of diversity throughout the region.
  • Black Lives Matter Louisville/Stand Up Sunday (Louisville): $1,000 to support their Healing Music Series, which uses creative place-making and cultural organizing as a model for community healing. The event will bring together local healers, body practitioners, and visual and performing artists to collectively tend to the wounds of generational racial trauma, structural oppression and lived experiences of violence which affect members of the community.
  • Bridge Kids International (Louisville): $4,750 for Ramona Dallum Lindsey and Stacy Bailey-Ndiaye to engage a diverse group of participants in the development of a public art installation in Louisville’s Ben Washer Park. The project will use the power of storytelling to transform an underutilized park in a low-income community and honor the often unrecognized contributions African American, Irish and Jewish groups have made to the development of the Limerick neighborhood. The project will amplify new voices, promote greater understanding, and create a neighborhood asset to be treasured for generations.
  • Carnegie Center for Literacy & Learning (Lexington): $4,770 to support the Young Women Writers Project, through which six female writers will mentor groups of young
  • women (9-12th grade students) to explore writing and literary performance techniques. The project will support creative self-expression, positive role modeling, and skill-building, and will encourage young women to discover their own voices while examining issues of concern to them, including body image and self-esteem.
  • Country Queers (Mallie): $3,016 to develop a touring gallery exhibit featuring photographs, printed text, and audio of oral history interviews with rural and small town LGBTQ+ folks throughout the U.S. The project will address the strong sense of isolation felt by rural and small town LGBTQ+ folks and provide a space for face-to-face connection and community-building.
  • Mikaela Curry (Pikeville): $1,000 to organize a series of poetry workshops and writing sessions, and to expand an annual poetry contest to include community members in the five easternmost counties of Kentucky. This series of community events and contests will center on prompts related to social justice from notable Kentucky women and will generate a body of work from community members that reflects the voices of Eastern Kentucky.
  • The Filson Historical Society (Louisville): $3,000 to engage young people in an educational sculpting activity as they learn about Louisville-born and nationally renowned sculptor Enid Yandell (1869-1934). The project will raise awareness about the limitations female artists confronted in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries and how Yandell’s work continues to inspire and influence female artists in the 21st century.
  • Robin G. (Louisville): $1,000 to support a multimedia project blending photography, videography, spoken word & storytelling to promote speaking out as a source of freedom in response to trauma in the lives of everyday women. This project will encourage survivors to utilize their voices, to tell the story of their fight in their own words, and to spark conversations that may be long overdue in their families and communities.
  • Girls Rock Louisville (Louisville): $7,500 to support their fourth annual summer camp for girls, trans, and gender non-conforming youth ages 10-18 at Meyzeek Middle School. Campers will develop music and leadership skills while participating in workshops focused on self-empowerment, social justice, community engagement and unrestricted creative self-expression.
  • Jennifer Hart (Lexington): $7,500 to partner with Lexington’s Hope Center Recovery Program for Women to create a program of focused therapeutic art quilt classes for clients. Participants will create an art quilt that tells the story of their journey through addiction and recovery, and the project will raise awareness about addiction, the difficulties of recovery, and the importance of substance abuse recovery programs.
  • Henderson Area Arts Alliance (Henderson): $3,000 to support a workshop at the Women’s Addiction Recovery Manor (WARM), partnering women in recovery with dancers from Dance Kaleidoscope and creating dances based on their life stories. The
  • workshop will offer participants a creative outlet through which to share their stories. The final performance will create dialogue about the challenges and triumphs of women in the WARM program.
  • Hindman Settlement School (Hindman): $1,700 to seed the new Nikki Giovanni Scholarship program, which will provide free attendance to the Appalachian Writers’ Workshop for select women writers of color. This program will help to diversify the Appalachian Writers’ Workshop’s constituency and create feminist social change in the Appalachian literary movement by increasing access for all women-identified writers of color who want to study in a tradition that is too commonly seen as white and male.
  • Jeri Katherine Howell (Frankfort): $7,443 facilitate lyric writing, singing and recording workshops for pre- and teenage girls who participate in HeartBEATS, a weekly Hip Hop, beat making and music production youth development program for middle and high school students at The Kings Center in Frankfort, KY. HeartBEATS provides young people with the tools to express their emotions and tell their stories through music; emphasizes positive relationships and collaboration with peers and professional, local teaching artists; and enhances confidence and success through creative mastery.
  • Josephine Sculpture Park (Frankfort): $7,500 to support The Porch Project, a long-term sculptural installation conceived and built by community members and local artists that will be on exhibit at Josephine Sculpture Park. The Porch will amplify the work of artists of color and serve as a catalyst for social change, community conversations, and personal transformation.
  • Kentucky Women Writers Conference Inc. (Lexington): $4,630 to support workshops, craft talks, publishing seminars, and readings focused on socially engaged writing as part of the 40th anniversary Kentucky Women Writers Conference in Lexington. The workshops will educate, inspire, and build community among women readers and writers in Kentucky, and will support feminist artists by paying them fairly for their labor.
  • Latinx Leadership and College Experience Camp (Lexington): $4,000 to support classes that offer Latinx and immigrant students from across the state opportunities to develop artistic skills while learning about social justice movements and cultural organizing skills from femme and non-binary artists. Participants will tell their stories, heal from past/current traumas, and find self-affirmation through a completed production or a new skill rooted lifelong artistic development.
  • Looking for Lilith Theatre Company (Louisville): $2,000 to work with local playwright Eli Keel to produce the premiere of his new play Note, which explores both the impact and stigma of mental illness. The show will address mental illness and neurodiversity through a complex and relatable character, which will raise awareness and create dialogue both within the company and among audience members.
  • Louisville Urban League (Louisville): $6,000 to support Girls League of the West (GLOW), an empowerment based program for middle school aged black girls, culminating in the creation of book focused on real life experiences. The program will provide creative opportunities for participants and the work they create will change the discourse around black girlhood, which will lead to the nurturing, understanding and equitable treatment that black girls deserve in all spaces.
  • The Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center (Lexington): $7,500 to organize an exhibition of visual art and poetry as part of a festival celebrating International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month in March of 2020. The exhibition will feature works created by professional artists and writers as well as works created in workshops with community members, and will foster relationships between diverse groups of creative women in the greater Lexington area through the arts.
  • Patrice K. Muhammad and Treena Burnett (Lexington): $7,366 to create a collaborative podcast, taped in-studio and on location throughout Kentucky, highlighting the stories of women whose loved ones are incarcerated. These podcasts will provide an outlet for women to share their powerful stories of love and commitment to their mothers, siblings, husbands and loved ones and will raise awareness of the impact of mass incarceration on families.
  • On the Move Art Studio (Lexington): $1,975 to support workshops led by Kathy Werking engaging teen girls of color as they explore how their identity is shaped by living in a small town/rural community. Participants will learn how to use their voice in their community to increase awareness of social justice issues and to advocate for change, building community and serving as a support network for one another. Owensboro Dance Theatre, Inc. (Owensboro): $5,000 to engage women and girls of diverse generations, abilities, races, and socio-economic backgrounds through the power of dance. Utilizing dance therapy, education, and community outreach, ODT will empower participants to challenge stereotypes, improve self-confidence, and develop their creative voice.
  • Laura Petrie (Paducah): $7,500 to produce My Syster’s Art, a multimedia event which includes a 3-day lesbian film festival, an 8-week public feminist art show, a 2-day filmmaking workshop, and a writing workshop. The festival will create a space for women to come together, network, share their art, and create new work in a supportive, woman-centered environment.
  • Play Cousins Collective (Louisville): $7,000 to provide engaging, culturally appropriate children’s programming through arts-based lesson plans centered on characters of color and focused on self-love, healthy body image, understanding emotions, and more. The program will ensure that parents are able to engage in school and community events while their children receive creative and positive programming. In the process, participants will gain a greater appreciation for themselves and other people of color.
  • Leslie Pryor (Louisville): $4,000 to support community based theatre productions that explore health issues that impact the African American community such as HIV/AIDS, breast cancer, and mental health, and to provide information and resources through an entertaining medium. The performances will reduce stigma, promote dialogue, and encourage audience members to be proactive about their health.
  • Brenda Richardson (Somerset): $5,000 to connect artists in multiple art forms with women who are or have been incarcerated, and with others whose lives are impacted by addiction, trauma and poverty. The year-long, weekly program, held in the community and in jails, will enable women and people from Eastern Kentucky to gain appreciation for the strengths each can bring to the other, and increase awareness of steps individuals and communities can take to become more responsible to each other.
  • Jessica Salyer (Salyersville): $5,860 to host free art classes for women, creating space for self-care and creative expression for women who spend much of their time caring for others. The classes will give women from all walks of life a fun, relaxing, and therapeutic experience in a region where such opportunities are scarce.
  • Shelby Regional Arts Council (SRAC) in collaboration with Mari Mujica (Shelbyville): $5,985 to bring participatory art workshops to Drug Court participants in Shelby County as they complete their court-mandated requirements. Community partners include Gogh Crazy, Sixth and Main Coffeehouse, and Awake Ministries. The project will increase self-esteem among participants, heighten solidarity and connection between participants going through healing and recovery, and increase compassion and understanding of addiction, recovery and the power of art on those indirectly affected by addiction.
  • Spirit of Sophia, Inc. (Louisville): $5,561 to offer art journaling workshops for women who are experiencing life transitions, and to assist them in creating a vision board that reflects their future dreams as they move into a new stage of their lives. The workshop will create dialogue among women of different ages and life experiences, and will provide creative tools that will help them envision their future and achieve their goals.
  • Lakshmi Sriraman (Lexington): $7,500 to create and present an interactive dance-theater production that blends contemporary theater, South Indian folk art traditions such as Parai and Therukkoothu, and Indian classical dance form called Bharatanatyam. The performance will be followed by a community dialogue about women’s struggles, strength, power, and resilience.
  • Steam Exchange (Louisville): $4,750 to support the youth-led design and creation of a mural, in collaboration with their friends and families that uses a feminist perspective to highlight the strengths and identities of the Smoketown neighborhood and its residents. Young men and women will create common language and common visuals to express a collective understanding of feminism and equally claim their power as feminists.
  • Julie Struck (Berea): $3,280 to engage teenage girls from Berea high schools in a public mural project focused on youth mental health based on photographs of their hands holding objects that help them feel safe, secure and empowered. The project will provide
  • a space where participants can talk openly about mental health issues, and the finished work will raise awareness and reduce stigma by bringing these issues out into the open.
  • Rheonna Nicole (Louisville): $7,500 to partner with ArtsReach of Kentucky Center for the Arts to produce the 5th annual Lipstick Wars Poetry Slam, a dynamic spoken word platform featuring women of color in Kentucky and surrounding states, and to expand the slam into a full day event at Whitney Hall with workshops, networking opportunities, and more. The event will expand opportunities for women, teens and families to access and engage with the art. Holding the slam at Whitney Hall will demonstrate that the voices of women of color are not marginal, but are vital to Louisville’s arts community.
  • Young Authors Greenhouse (Louisville): $5,000 to partner with Olmsted Academy South Middle School (all-female public school) to offer a writing program for young women, culminating in the publication of their work in a chapbook to be shared with the community. Participants will use creative nonfiction to explore issues that impact their lives, such as health, body image, social media, and societal expectations of girlhood.

 

 

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2018 grantees

ARTIST ENRICHMENT

  • Becky Alley (Lexington): $1,500 to work on a new piece exploring the aesthetics of gender, power, and the sacred through a memorial for civilians killed in the current Yemeni Civil War. Creating the work will further Alley’s development as an artist and provide new artwork for her repertoire. The completed piece will honor the innocent and unsung war dead and give power to gestures of empathy and vulnerability.
  • Gabriella Bedetti (Lexington): $1,450 to work on a poetry collection exploring issues of aging and ageism, and to give readings at senior centers and living communities. Getting mentorship and peer feedback will help develop her voice as a feminist poet. The finished work and public readings will challenge ageism by celebrating and amplifying the voices of older women.
  • Rebekah Berry (Frankfort): $1,000 to develop her skills as a musician, writer, songwriter, performer and photographer while exploring topics such as sexual assault, power dynamics and relationships, and healing. The grant will help her strengthen and refine her voice and the finished work will create dialogue about a range of feminist issues.
  • Tammy Clemons and Timi Reedy (Big Hill): $1,524 for tools to create new audio pieces about their grandmothers’ unsung talents and enduring legacies. The grant will strengthen their audio skills and enable them to connect with and learn from other women in the audio field. The finished work will raise awareness about ways women have innovated artistically and technologically and challenge stereotypes about women and the region.
  • Commonwealth Theatre Center (Louisville): $1,700 to develop world folklore stories of intelligent, strong women into an original musical play, NO MORE DAMSELS IN DISTRESS. The project will provide an opportunity for women artists to collaborate on a feminist social change piece. The finished work will introduce audiences to forgotten stories from all over the world featuring female characters.
  • Erin Alise Conley (Salyersville): $2,000 to purchase a desktop computer for video editing, audio editing, digital art, and graphic design for “Weird Appalachia,” a podcast and YouTube channel created to lift up Appalachian artists. The grant will provide her with the tools needed to take her artistry to the next level. The podcast and YouTube channel will challenge the stigma on Appalachia and Eastern Kentucky artists, especially women, by showcasing and celebrating their work.
  • Cara Blake Coppola (Lexington): $2,500 for training and mentoring as she works on her memoir about raising a daughter with multiple disabilities who has much to tell the world. The classes and mentoring will help her hone her craft. The finished work will connect a community of mothers and caregivers who often feel isolated, while amplifying the voices of young women and girls living with disabilities.
  • Amanda Kelley Corbin (Lexington): $1,000 to work on a novel about four female characters dealing with issues such as miscarriage, pregnancy and birth, foster care, mental health issues, and addiction. Working on the novel will expand her body of work and help her grow as a writer. The finished work will promote awareness, empathy, and understanding around the complex themes in the book and how women deal with them.
  • Mikaela Curry (Pikeville): $2,000 to create a poetic body of work that examines the ways in which women, particularly women of traditionally marginalized or oppressed groups, leave their Kentucky communities, whether it is by death, circumstance or choice. This project will further develop her skills as a writer, researcher, community organizer, and performer. The finished work will increase awareness about both historical and modern obstacles facing women in Kentucky and the impact of these obstacles on communities.
  • Erica De La O (Louisville): $5,000 to research and create a series of dance performance installations at Kentucky sites where historically significant acts of oppression have been documented. Creating the piece will hone her skills as a social change artist, and the performances will raise awareness about our nation’s history of cruelty towards people of Mexican descent, and its intersections with the oppression of other people of color and other oppressed groups.
  • Heather Dent and Grace McKenzie (Berea): $1,000 to work on a children’s picture book about Dr. Michelle Tooley, former professor of Social Justice at Berea College and lifelong activist for women and education, particularly in Central American countries. The collaboration will help them both develop as social change artists, and the finished work will inspire children to become advocates for social change.
  • Hannah DeWitt (Louisville): $2,000 to create a life-size sculpture of a flinching female torso made of silicone, with the intention of calling attention to inequality and creating a visceral experience in the viewer. Creating the sculpture will help her develop her ability to communicate complex feminist concepts through art. The finished work will promote dialogue about rape culture and the detrimental effects of sexual abuse and domestic violence.
  • Elizabeth DiSavino (Berea): $1,300 to record ballads of unknown early Kentucky ballad collector Katherine Jackson French, who put together the first large, scholarly collection of Appalachian (Kentucky) ballads. The project will provide a unique opportunity for her to combine scholarly writing, written ballads, and a recording. The finished work honors the memory of one of London, Kentucky’s proudest daughters.
  • Tamika Dozier (Louisville): $2,000 to help produce a documentary on black women’s friendships, including challenges they face and how they overcome those challenges. Creating the film will further develop her skills as a black feminist curator. The finished work will create dialogue about colorism, body shaming, and sex shaming and their impact on relationships among black women, as well as about the importance of cultivating these friendships in the face of such obstacles.
  • Gina Elliott (Berea): $1,000 to provide martial arts instruction to women of all ages, in particular the art of Jiu Jitsu. The course will provide new opportunities for her to develop as a teacher while pursuing her longer term goal of becoming a Black Belt. The courses will build confidence and strength in participants while introducing women to a proportionally male dominated activity.
  • Jade Ellis (Somerset): $3,500 to obtain the training and tools needed to design a collection of vests from recycled neckties. The grant will provide time and resources for her to expand her ability and skills as a feminist fabric artist. The completed collection will promote dialogue about gender norms, social acceptance, and body positivity in a small rural community.
  • Susie Rozzell Fenwick (Water Valley): $1,000 to work on a creative nonfiction novel portraying a rural woman subjected to physical, mental and verbal abuse and how her love of literature and music provided refuge. The grant will help her hone her skills as a feminist writer. The finished work will draw attention to rural domestic abuse and the importance of access of arts for women in rural Kentucky.
  • Ashli Findley (Louisville): $7,500 to write, edit, and publish a 30-page book of journalistic commentary on midwifery care and the growing home birth movement in Kentucky. The grant will help her develop her skills as a writer, and the finished work will elevate women’s voices and educate legislators and the general public on the benefits of midwifery.
  • Flashback Theatre Company (Somerset): $1,300 to work with Sommer Schoch to develop and workshop a new musical about Mary, mother of God. The musical will promote the development of the playwright, the actors, and the theatre company. The finished work will change attitudes and create dialogue about the role of one of history’s most famous women.
  • Amanda Forsting (Louisville): $1,500 to work on a novel about Guila Bustabo, child prodigy violinist whose career did not receive the same recognition as her male counterparts. Researching and writing the book will help her develop her skills as a social change artist. The finished work will challenge assumptions about Bustabo and raise awareness of her overlooked accomplishments as a feminist artist alone in a world of chaos and male dominance.
  • Jasmine Fouts(Frankfort): $1,000 to work on producing a live show of her original material. The project will provide the opportunity for her to create a live recording of her songs. The completed work will showcase the truth of a feminist artist who is rooted in her community and dedicated to representing those whose voices need to be amplified.
  • Carla Gover and Teresa Tomb (Lexington): $3,000 to create choreography set to original arrangements of Appalachian ballads featuring strong female characters who defy traditional gender roles, which will be featured in a live performance as well as a professional music video. The collaboration will expand their scope as feminist artists, and the finished work will highlight the intrinsic strength of women in the cultural landscape of Appalachia.
  • Constance Grayson (Nicholasville): $1,000 to work on a body of fiber art called “The Strongest Ties,” exploring traditional methods of fabric manipulation and the strength of the women who have historically used those techniques to create items that are both utilitarian and beautiful. Creating the pieces will provide an opportunity for her to immerse herself in these powerful fiber art techniques. The finished work will celebrate art forms that are too often devalued or dismissed in a “high art” setting.
  • Hannah Gregory (Dayton): $1,300 to work on an original play with music that follows the journey of a woman’s miscarriage and subsequent independence as a female vigilante. The project will provide an opportunity for her to develop multilayered female characters. The play will create dialogue about miscarriage and other taboo subjects that affect women.
  • Rachel Grimes (Milton): $1,500 to work on full orchestrations for the Louisville Orchestra as part of the next phase of her folk opera, The Way Forth. Inspired by a treasure trove of family photos, documents, and letters, the opera explores perspectives of generations of Kentucky women from 1775 to the present. Creating the orchestrations will support her continued growth as a composer in an extremely male-dominated field. The completed work will bring awareness to our shared history and responsibility related to hundreds of years of social inequality and injustice.
  • Melissa Helton (Asher): $1,200 to support a project exploring the history of postcards, particularly their use of the female body, their use by women, and their use for political and educational purposes. The research and writing process will provide an opportunity to explore the interplay between creative non-fiction and poetry. The finished work will raise awareness about the use of women as art/marketing and broaden the discourse about women, art, communication, and feminism.
  • Nancy C. Jones (Midway): $1,200 to support research activities in library archives in Paris for a play based on and inspired by the art exhibit “Women Artists in Paris: 1850-1900” that was presented at the Speed Museum last year in Louisville. Researching and writing the play will give her a chance to focus on her own craft after years of mentoring and teaching others. The finished work will introduce audiences to the work of both well-known and lesser known female artists working during a time when women were largely barred from formal artistic education.
  • Elizabeth Kilcoyne (Lexington): $2,500 to work with a mentor to develop a first draft of a feminist southern gothic novel. Working with a mentor will help her develop the skills needed to write in this genre. The finished work will help readers to understand the impact that community and chosen family has on children processing grief, as well as the effect substance abuse and mental illness have on women, children, and families in Kentucky.
  • Mary Knight (Lexington): $2,000 to work on her middle grade novel, WHAT THE SEAHORSE TOLD ME, about a young girl of Hawaiian ancestry coming to terms with her unique power and finding the courage to use it for the greater good. The grant will provide opportunities for her to hone her craft while learning more about publishing and promotion. The finished work will provide a platform for engaging with youth about using their talents and voices for the things they care about most.
  • Kim Kobersmith (Berea): $2,500 to create and distribute 150 posters with 100-word biographies and pictures of historical women who have had a lasting impact on the Commonwealth. Writing the biographies will hone her writing skills and give her experience working with historical sources. The posters will encourage women to take pride in their heritage while providing inspiration for their own important work.
  • Colleen Merrill (Lexington): $1,500 to participate in a self-directed residency, engage with other artist/mothers, and develop a body of fiber-based work that explores the gendered dimensions of the roles of partner and mother. The grant will help her develop her artistry while fostering community among artists who often find themselves isolated. The work created will spark dialogue about how societal roles and expectations impact intimate relationships, sexuality, and gender identity.
  • Moments Matter Inc. (Louisville): $3,500 to support four 2-day young author boot camps for middle and high school girls, in partnership with BK Royston Publishing. Participants will develop lasting friendships and will be invited to submit their work to the “Moments Matter” book series. The books will provide an opportunity for each participant to become a published author and to inspire others that they can do the same.
  • Danielle Muzina (Murray): $3,000 to support a new body of figurative paintings addressing the charged interpersonal dynamics between women on an everyday level as we negotiate the way differing belief systems interact with global women’s rights movements and crises. Creating the work will help her develop a feminist body of work that can cross geographic and cultural boundaries. The completed paintings will create dialogue and encourage solidarity among women here in Kentucky as well as in her family’s home country of Croatia.
  • Alanna Nash (Louisville): $2,500 to support work on a nonfiction book based on her 16-year relationship with a warm, witty, and brilliant feminist who struggled with anxiety, panic disorder, PTSD, and depression, ultimately leading to an accidental overdose of prescription opioids. Writing the book will help her branch out into memoir as a genre. The finished work will raise awareness about mental health issues affecting women and the importance of a healthy mother-daughter bond.
  • Nevertheless Arts Ensemble, Inc. (Louisville): $1,500 to support a concert event to be presented in early summer 2019, which will feature women performing art created by women. The grant will sharpen the skills of the Artistic Director and the ability of all participants to work as an ensemble. The ensemble will provide a safe and supportive environment for female artists, while increasing exposure of women writers and composers who are overlooked and under-recognized.
  • Toya Northington (Louisville): $3,000 to attend a workshop to develop skills in encaustic painting, and to create new works inspired by her 2006 series titled Flowers for the Young Woman. The project will reinvigorate her artistic practice and the finished work will create dialogue about gender inequality and societal expectations experienced by African American/ black women.
  • Jardana Peacock (Louisville): $1,500 to attend a retreat to work on a collection of personal essays that explore identity, mothering, queerness, activism, heartbreak, and love against the backdrop of the places, experiences and people that have helped shape and define her. The retreat will provide the time and space needed to focus on the project. The finished work will create dialogue about the often unspoken ways that race, class, sexuality, trauma, lineage and place define our lives.
  • Mitchella Phipps (Whitesburg): $2,500 to work on a guitar and fiddle curriculum merging female traditional mountain artists with modern popular music styles to build interest and skills in Appalachian music students. The project will boost her visibility as a local, queer, feminist artist and educator while showcasing unsung female artists in a male-dominated genre.
  • Rainbow Star (Berea): $3,000 to develop vocal and songwriting skills with professional coaches, and enter a formal mentorship with an accredited music industry consultant. These activities will enable her to produce better music and broaden her audience. The work created will inspire other Appalachian women musicians and encourage audiences to feel connected by and proud of their heritage.
  • Safiyyah Rasool (Louisville): $5,000 to further her education and training in African dance and Urban Hip Hop dance with various dance tribes and groups in Nigeria, Africa, and to apply this knowledge in teaching. The grant will help her develop her skills in these genres, and the classes will bring these skills to women in her community while fostering self-esteem, self-confidence, self-expression, and cultural enrichment among participants.
  • Tara Remington (Louisville): $1,000 to offer creative, mindful activities to young mothers who stay at the Volunteers of America Family Emergency Shelter (VOA-FES). The project will foster self-reflection, connection, and compassion among participants while creating dialogue about women’s issues and human rights.
  • Rheonna Nicole (Louisville): $1,500 to produce a poetry and exhale writing workshop for women poets (particularly women of color) at the Louisville Free Public Library. Leading the workshops will help her connect with other women of color and sharpen her skills as a poet and facilitator. The workshops will create a safe and supportive space for participants to develop and share their words in a community setting.
  • Tiffany Robinson (Louisville): $2,500 to work on a series of children’s books that provide positive portrayals of African American family life. The funding will support her development as a writer and provide an opportunity to mentor a young African American woman illustrator. The finished work will challenge unhealthy stereotypes and provide children with stories crafted to build dignity, compassion, self-confidence, and empathy.
  • ross (Bowling Green): $1,200 to partner with Tony Rachel Chavkin and her Brooklyn-based company, The TEAM, as part of a 5-day ensemble performance workshop at Appalshop in Whitesburg. The collaboration will benefit Appalachian stakeholders institutionally, culturally, financially, and artistically. The finished work will create dialogue and new opportunities for artistic collaboration between progressive urban and rural artists.
  • Sasha Renee (Louisville): $2,000 to work on her next full studio album and jump start both the street and social media marketing for the project. Completing the album will take her career to the next level while she continues to build her fan base. The music created will challenge stereotypes, empower women, and redefine what it means to be a queer masculine expressing black woman today.
  • Scz- pronounced “seize”– (Louisville): $1,000 to work on a zine documenting their experiences as a sonic curator and deejay through poetry, prose, photography and mixed media. Creating the work will deepen their skills in production and design. This work will in the future be part of a multimedia gallery event which will provide a safer space where participants can build a sense of connectedness and community through self-expression and creative place-making.
  • Senora May (Irvine): $2,000 to work on an album based on interviews with women and girls in Kentucky reflecting their diverse experiences, perspectives, and concerns. Creating the album will help May develop her recording and production skills. The collaboration and finished work will create dialogue about motherhood, gender roles, sexuality, and other issues of interest to women and girls across the commonwealth.
  • Side by Side (Louisville): $3,000 to hold free art and writing workshops for girls and women to explore the power of art and storytelling to shape lives. The workshops will help the organization expand its reach and provide a space for participants who may not otherwise have access to arts programming. The workshops will provide a space for participants to positively explore identity and expression in a world that often silences the voices of girls and women.
  • South Central Kentucky Kids on the Block (Bowling Green): $2,000 to bring educational puppetry to children in Kentucky schools who have limited access to this kind of programming. The grant will expand the reach of the program, which teaches children valuable lessons about safety, empathy, social diversity and equality.
  • Jessica Joy Stowe (Paducah): $1,000 to create photography that addresses objectification, sexual abuse, domestic violence, healing, and other, issues that affect women. The grant will help her develop a body of feminist photographs, and the finished work will raise awareness about a range of feminist topics.
  • Teatro Tercera Llamada (Louisville): $3,000 to co-produce a bilingual play, “Just Like Us” by Karen Zacarias, with Looking for Lilith Theatre Company. This collaboration will help them reach new audiences, and the play will raise awareness of DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival) recipients and their struggles to reach the American Dream.
  • Brigit Truex (Lexington): $1,350 to work on a book of prose and poems based on the Wakamatsu Colony in 1800s California. Working on the book will help her grow as a social change artist. The finished work will raise awareness and create dialogue about the challenges facing immigrants and refugees historically, as well as in the present context.
  • Leah Van Winkle (Berea): $2,500 to attend a series of yoga and contact improvisation workshops to deepen her practice with and skill at facilitating body-based empowerment workshops for women. Working with these mentors will help her develop as an artist and teacher. The workshops will create a safe space to explore issues of body image, body connection, touch and boundaries through creative movement.
  • Whitney Newman Withington (Big Hill): $2,716 to create artist books with a textual and visual narrative presenting the lives of African American women and their families in Appalachia. Through mentorships, she will learn to combine traditional letterpress techniques with computer-edited printing and photographic transfers. The finished work will raise the visibility of African American women in media and literature within her community.

ART MEETS ACTIVISM

  • Olivia C. Allen, Founder, I Can Be Girls Confidence Conference (Louisville): $2,900 to support a series of self-expression workshops to be conducted during the I Can Be Girls Confidence Conference in Fall 2018. Through dance, poetry, spoken word, music and photography, tween girls (ages 8 -12) will learn to find, develop and utilize their voices for causes and issues that are important to them.
  • Americana Fiberworks (Louisville): $5,629 to engage refugee and immigrant women in the creation of culturally-relevant fiber art that directly benefits their families and communities. The program will cultivate connections between women of different cultural backgrounds and enable participants to build a new social support network as they adjust to their new hometown of Louisville, Kentucky.
  • The Appalachian Artisan Center (Hindman): $5,300 to support a camp and series of classes teaching young girls the art of blacksmithing and its relevance in the Appalachian region. The girls will work with a master blacksmith on projects that incorporate lessons on feminism, empowerment, equality, and justice, leading them become leaders in their community
  • Rev. Cynthia P Cain (Mackville): $1,500 to engage 15-20 young women in the creation of a literary blog/website which will incorporate interviews with elders and women in the Black community, culminating in a public presentation based on this work in early 2019. This project will empower youth and create a venue for future engagement and truth-telling across racial lines in this small, rural town.
  • Carnegie Center for Literacy & Learning (Lexington): $1,500 to support the Young Women Writers Project, in which established female writers mentor groups of young women. Students from ninth to twelfth grade will explore writing and literary performance techniques while examining issues of concern to them, including body image and self-esteem. This project helps young writers develop writing skills, gain confidence and self-respect, and find their own voices.
  • John A. Coulter (Director) and Ashley R. Glass (Actress) of Tunnell Mill Pictures, LLC (Bardstown): $3,000 for post-production expenses for their full length feature film titled The Private, focused on the participation of women fighting as soldiers in the American Civil War. The film will shed light on a neglected chapter of women’s history and raise awareness about women whose stories are rarely told.
  • EpiCentre Arts (Whitesburg): $4,250 to work with the women at a local domestic violence center in the design and creation of a mural in the entrance hallway of the facility. Participants will learn new skills and gain self-confidence while easing the stress of clients entering a new and unknown space. The finished mural will provide a cheery, welcoming, and safe atmosphere for future residents.
  • The Girl Project (Lexington): $4,000 to add a new focus on documentary theatre, involving workshops, performances and community outreach, to its already established program for young women and girls. Participants work together to raise their voices against unrealistic media images and engage in forms of art that allow them to understand women’s lived experiences of social inequalities. The program helps girls gain the confidence they need to set long-term goals, develop positive relationships and social circles, and advocate for social change.
  • Girls Rock Louisville (Louisville): $5,000 to support a summer camp for girls and gender non-conforming youth ages 10-18 at Western Middle School. Campers will develop musicianship and leadership skills while participating in workshops focused on self-empowerment, social justice, community engagement and creative self-expression.
  • Hindman Settlement School (Hindman): $1,500 to seed the new Nikki Giovanni Scholarship program, which will provide free attendance to the Appalachian Writers Workshop for select women writers of color. This seed money will provide a needed foundation for current efforts to diversify the Appalachian Writers Workshop’s constituency, creating feminist social change in the Appalachian literary movement by increasing access and welcome to all women-identified writers of color who want to study in a tradition that is too commonly homogenized as white and male.
  • Kentucky Women Writers Conference (Lexington): $1,500 to support workshops, craft talks, publishing seminars, and readings focused on socially engaged writing as part of the 40th annual Kentucky Women Writers Conference. Grant funds will be used to compensate artists leading the activities, which are designed to educate, inspire, and build community among women readers and writers in Kentucky.
  • Latinx Leadership and College Experience Camp Social Justice Project (Lexington): $5,000 for LLCEC Corazón Leadership Team to engage Latinx and immigrant students in diverse art activities (mural, beat production, poetry, podcasting, and more) while they learn about social justice movements and cultural organizing skills, as a strategy for shifting consciousness. The project promotes self-care through the arts, healing from past/current trauma, and lifelong artistic development.
  • Betty Lawson/ Bondurant Middle/ Western Hills High School Student Support Center (Frankfort): $1,000 to engage middle and high schools students in workshops that incorporate forms of creative expression such as poetry and journaling to reflect, set goals, and build relationships. The workshops will teach students to use writing as a means to reflect on and communicate about topics important to them, such as self-esteem, relationships, suicide, human trafficking, depression, and bullying.
  • Leslie Pryor Productions (Louisville): $2,000 to address health issues that affect the African-American community, such as HIV/AIDS, breast cancer and mental health, through theatre. The production will raise awareness about issues affecting the community, continuing LPP’s mission of educating and informing through entertainment.
  • Louisville Urban League (Louisville): $4,000 to launch their first Girls League of the West (GLOW) Summer Camp, a space of sisterhood rooted in activities that promote the celebration, liberation, and motivation of self. Using creative expression and cultural excursions, this five-day camp will provide a safe space for Black girls to connect with each other and challenge society’s flawed perspective of their experiences.
  • Daniel Martin Moore (Louisville): $2,425 to create an album (LP, CD, and digital) of all-original, new recordings in collaboration with diverse artists and writers from across the Commonwealth, culminating in a series of concerts/ readings/ events celebrating this work. The project will bring together social justice artists from many disciplines from across the state, and raise awareness about land and water conservation and other issues addressed by participating artists.
  • Media Working Group/ Jean Donohue (Covington): $3,500 to produce a documentary about a 1970s feminist consciousness-raising experiment in Lexington, KY and the subsequent migration to a farm in Mt. Sterling. The story will be constructed with interviews, photos and other materials provided by the women who participated in The Women’s Collective. The documentary will inspire women and young girls to seek their own life course, to gather with inquiring and like minds, and to live true to their nature.
  • Candace Mullins (Somerset): $7,121 to work with non-profits and community spaces to host weaving, spinning and dying workshops in three communities in Kentucky. Attendees will learn how to take natural fiber all of the way to useable fiber and cloth. The project will raise awareness about the energy and artistry involved in transforming fiber into clothing and finished cloth.
  • Pamela Mullins, Community and Restorative Justice Covington (Covington): $1,000 to hold workshops exploring the detrimental impact of female incarceration on families, and to create videos reflecting an informed understanding of activism and advocacy for social change by the participants. Workshops will inspire reflection and dialogue, while creating the videos will provide participants a platform for action, collaboration, and community building.
  • Owensboro Dance Theatre, Inc. (Owensboro): $3,750 to offer a five-day residence with Nan Giordano and Giordano Dance Chicago where 500 women (ages 5-75) will utilize dance to find their artistic and creative voices while challenging unrealistic expectations of women in today’s society. Participants will engage in performances, classes, and development sessions that edify and enrich their quality of life while celebrating diverse body types and abilities through movement and dance.
  • Laura Petrie (Paducah): $4,000 to support My Syster’s Art Initiative, an umbrella event which will inspire, encourage and challenge women and lesbians to produce feminist art to share in the public forum. The event will provide spaces for women to display their art, build feminist community, increase public awareness of female issues, and encourage other women to find their voice.
  • Brenda Richardson (Somerset): $5,000 to bring Art Behind Bars, a holistic arts program, to women incarcerated in the Knox County Detention Center. The women will gain self-esteem and a new means to express themselves. The project will build support networks for an arts-centered approach to addressing recidivism, abuse and addiction in Knox and surrounding counties.
  • Rise and Root Rewilding Project, in association with Kentucky Heartwood (Berea): $4,000 to facilitate a series of immersive nature experiences with children and youth with a focus on sharing, receiving, and developing the stories that grow out of a relationship with wildness and place. Participants will learn to artistically interact with the natural world through nature journals. The experience will inspire them to step into their power as advocates for social and ecological justice.
  • Steam Exchange (Louisville): $3,700 to work with kid focus groups in the Smoketown neighborhood to collaboratively design a gender neutral t-shirt collection that helps kids feel safe and empowered to be themselves. The culturally progressive clothing will also educate the Louisville community, including parents, to grow beyond binary gender stereotypes.
  • Rheonna Thornton (Louisville): $6,500 to partner with ArtsReach to create the 4th annual Lipstick Wars Poetry Slam, a feminist platform for women of color spoken word artists in Kentucky and neighboring states. The poetry slam will feature women poets of diverse backgrounds who will bring to light a multitude of complex issues women and girls face today including gender discrimination, exploitation, sexism, and body-shaming.
  • Doris Thurber (Frankfort): $4,000 to work with Karen Hatter, Joanna Hay, and other artists to continue the arts-based addiction recovery program, Hands Healing HeArts, which engages women attending Franklin County’s Drug Court program in a range of arts workshops. The program empowers women to share their stories and find their voices. The public events will raise awareness and create much-needed dialogue in the community about addiction, recovery, and the healing power of art.
  • Jayne Moore Waldrop (Lexington): $1,500 to lead a writers’ workshop called “Finding One’s Voice: It’s Never Too Late,” to encourage beginning women writers at mid-life and older to use their voices to promote positive change in their communities. The workshops will help participants find their voice, learn new writing skills, and tell the stories that are important to them.
  • Amy Weinfurtner (Mount Vernon): $1,000 to lead a series of workshops on raising, preparing, and using rabbit hides for creative purposes. The workshops will empower women to put healthy food on their tables at the same time they are providing their own materials for sustainable fiber artistry.
  • Pamala G. Wiley (Louisville) $1,000 to engage women in retreats at three venues throughout Metro Louisville, designed to explore the subject of feminine power and discover ways in which women can empower each other through dialogue and poetry. Participants will be introduced to mindfulness art journaling, poetry and drumming as a way to tap into their feminine essence and discover ways to manifest their feminine power in daily life.
  • Talesha Wilson and Tamika Dozier (Louisville): $3,500 to create a short documentary of LBGTQ couples in Louisville, their relationships, and the obstacles they have faced across generations based on sexuality, race, and gender. Participants will develop new skills and build connections with other LBGTQ people/ couples. The documentary will provide positive representations of healthy Queer love, inspiring dialogue and understanding both within and outside of Louisville’s LBGTQ community.
  • Melody Youngblood (Berea): $2,425 to create a safe space for young women to share vulnerable stories of experiences that have shaped them and their self-image, and to turn those stories into song. The listening and sharing sessions will inspire and encourage women to create deeper connections with one another. The songs will move audiences and empower other women to tell the stories and heal from their own trauma.
2017 grantees

ARTIST ENRICHMENT

  • Sylvia Ahrens (Lexington): $1,000 for research and writing time to create a manuscript of poems about Rosalind Franklin. Creating the work will further advance her commitment as a feminist writer. The poems will highlight the life and accomplishments of a much undervalued voice in the field of science, reinforcing the idea that women can succeed in any field they choose.
  • Leslie Anglin (Louisville): $2,750 to attend a workshop on the art of kintsugi (the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery) and to create a new series of mixed-media work that addresses the transformative effect of loss on feminine identity. The workshop will expand her visual language as an artist. The resulting work will encourage dialogue among women about breakage and repair as essential parts of life.
  • Carrie Billett (Harlan): $7,000 to create new works and an exhibition exploring unconventional uses of traditional craft materials and techniques often seen as “women’s work.” Experimenting at the intersection of these varied techniques will refine her artistic voice. The finished work will create space for conversations in her community about art and women’s roles.
  • Tasha Cotter (Lexington): $1,000 for completion of a narrative-driven poetry collection tentatively titled Near and Far: A Poet’s Journey through America’s Parks. This grant will enable her to visit two parks that will be explored in detail in the manuscript. The finished work will address issues related to climate change, sustainability, and preserving natural resources from a feminist perspective.
  • Shannon Davis-Roberts (Murray): $2,000 to attend a series of workshops through Women Who Write and to write a short story cycle that centers on a young woman who develops a relationship with an intersex man. Attending events will help her develop as a feminist writer, and the stories will challenge traditional concepts of intimacy, love, and gender identity, and promote dialogue about the social stigma surrounding sexual ambiguity.
  • Rachel Grimes (Milton): $4,500 to support the continued creation and development of the music and script for a folk opera, The Way Forth, which explores perspectives of generations of Kentucky women from 1775 to the present. Creating the piece will expand the scope of the work and help her hone her orchestration skills. The finished work will inspire dialogue about the systematic oppression of women of European and African-American descent, and envision a new path forward.
  • Vanessa Grossl (Lexington): $1,000 to create a multimedia pop-up exhibit showcasing the stories of immigrant entrepreneurs/ restaurant owners in Lexington, KY. The project will further develop her skills as a photographer and cultural anthropologist. The exhibit will humanize immigrants and increase understanding of their hopes, dreams, and contributions in communities across the state.
  • Aaisha Hamid (Louisville): $3712 to produce and market a series of books dedicated to encouraging high school and college aged women to embrace their identities and speak up in a society that continuously stills their voices. The project will enable her to refine her writing skills while celebrating her own identity as a Pakistani American, Muslim woman. The books will introduce young women to powerful women protagonists and redefine the literary narrative society has created for them.
  • Julie Hensley (Richmond): $1,507 to fund a writing residency at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, where she will complete and revise her novel, The Recklessness of Water. The residency will deepen her skills as a feminist novelist. The finished work will foster more open dialogue about (in)fertility, sexuality, depression, abuse, and other topics affecting women, ultimately guiding readers toward personal and familial healing and growth.
  • DaMaris B. Hill (Lexington): $4,500 to create a multimedia digital poem titled “Harriet’s Crown” — a remixed version of a piece from her forthcoming poetry manuscript. Working in mixed media will expand her scope as a literary artist. The finished work will honor the legacy of Black women activists across time and create dialogue about the complex negotiation between national identity and the mass media coverage of police brutality against black bodies.
  • Jenny Hobson (Berea): $3,020 to complete a set of letters and essays exploring what it means to communicate with powerful men who set national policies with local impacts, and to create web-based tools and workshops with local activists based on this work. The letters and essays will create public dialogue about this form of political participation, and workshops will encourage others to communicate with and reflect on their interactions with those in power.
  • Rebecca Gayle Howell(Hindman): $3000 to work on her third book of poems, The Decisive Moment, which grapples with the 24-hour news cycle and the confessional voice. Writing in this mode will help her develop her feminist voice and connect the personal and the political in new ways. The finished work will encourage dialogue and inspire other women to speak their truths.
  • Trish Lindsey Jaggers (Smiths Grove): $3,711 to complete a poetry collection titled Birdshot: The Pellet Poems, and to conduct workshops and poetry readings based on this work. The grant will provide her the time, space, and objective distance needed to create the work. The workshops and readings will enlighten and encourage women to break old patterns of subservience and self-doubt and renew their goals.
  • Karen Jones (Lexington): $3,200 to produce an audio and videotape session of music and interviews with contemporary women fiddlers from Central Kentucky, to be held at the Lyric Theatre in Lexington. Producing the project will further her goals as a feminist artist by helping her fine-tune her own skills while providing a unique opportunity for other women fiddlers to hone their craft, learn from one another, and highlight their accomplishments.
  • Karen Lanier of KALA Creative (Lexington): $2,500 to attend conferences, work with a writing mentor, and attend workshops to develop her skills to better communicate about women’s perspectives on farming and the food systems. The activities will strengthen her writing skills and help build connections with women in the sustainable farming community, and will ultimately expand the scope of her work and its impact in the community.
  • Amira Karaoud (Louisville): $3,890 to create a multimedia art installation showcasing the variety of perspectives and experiences of Arab women living in the United States. The activities will strengthen her interviewing and photography skills and further her development as a feminist artist. The finished work will provide a voice for a community that is underrepresented and misrepresented locally and nationally.
  • Lori Larusso (Lexington): $5,000 to create a series of painting installations and printed materials that explore the relationship between traditional domestic practices and everyday activism. Creating the work will deepen her engagement with social change through art. The finished work will celebrate and encourage structural change though individual acts of resistance.
  • Jaqui Linder (Versailles): $1,000 to rent a gallery for a one-woman show and to exhibit a body of feminist artwork, much of which has never before been seen due to its very personal and gender political nature. The exhibit will increase her visibility as a feminist artist. The work itself will inspire dialogue about body hatred, eating disorders, media representations of women, and other feminist issues.
  • Looking for Lilith Theatre Company (Louisville): $4,000 to work with New Orleans’ based RacePeace to develop a framework for shifting racial dynamics and dismantling racism within their company. Working with RacePeace will help them develop as intersectional feminist artists, and will ultimately strengthen their ability to inspire social change within the larger community in which they live and work.
  • George Ella Lyon (Lexington): $1,500 to revise The Other Side of Everything, a novel about unacknowledged sexual abuse and grief carried over from one generation to the next. The revision process will deepen her ability to represent women’s silencing, shaming and scapegoating through the story. The finished work will be a catalyst of change within herself as an author, as well as her readers.
  • Kristen Renee Miller (Louisville): $4,500 to translate a book-length collection of poetry by indigenous poet Marie-Andrée Gill into English. The project will help Miller hone her skills as a feminist translator. The finished work will bring Gill’s work, which addresses themes of colonialism, ecology, and commodification, to an English-speaking readership that has not previously been able to access the work.
  • Marie Mitchell (Richmond): $1,000 to write a biography of Mary Creegan Roark, the first female President of what is now Eastern Kentucky University, for young readers. Working on the biography will strengthen her skills as a nonfiction writer. The finished work will educate readers about Roark’s contributions and inspire students to set goals and overcome obstacles in their lives.
  • Mary K. Morgan (Chappell): $1,000 to assemble a series of feminist, provocative, abstract, marketable, multimedia visual works. The grant will provide an opportunity for her to create and exhibit her work in an area where there are few resources for artists like herself. The work will expose audiences to perspectives, mediums, and ideas that challenge the status quo and foster respectful engagement across a variety of differences.
  • Jill Robertson (Hazard): $7,500 to take classes with a local artist and to produce a large community sculpture to be placed along the River Arts Greenway in the heart of downtown Hazard, Kentucky. The classes will further develop her metallurgy skills. The finished work will increase her visibility as a female welder and help normalize welding as an art form practiced by women.
  • Savannah Sipple (Lexington): $4,000 for a year of continuing education in creative nonfiction craft, ultimately leading to the completion of a collection of interconnected memoir essays. Attending workshops will strengthen her prose and give her the opportunity to work with other feminist LGBTQ writers. The finished work will address the intersection of issues such as women’s autonomy, physical and emotional abuse, Christian fundamentalism, body shaming, and homophobia from a queer, rural, feminist perspective.
  • Rainbow Star (Berea): $1,000 to complete her debut folk pop album and to tour this new work in venues across Appalachia. The tour will build her confidence as a feminist singer/songwriter and broaden her audience. The music will encourage dialogue about patriarchy and inspire women to pursue creative outlets as a means of healing and as a form of activism.
  • Jamey Temple (Williamsburg): $3,950 to complete a book of poetry about Korean international adoption informed by her experiences as an adoptive parent of Korean children. The project will develop her writing skills and deepen her commitment as a feminist writer. The finished work will raise awareness about the injustices facing the adoption triad (birth family, adoptee, and adoptive family) within a deeply flawed adoption system.
  • The Local Honeys (Linda Jean Stokley & Montana Hobbs) (Versailles): $2,000 to record a full-length album of songs to preserve and share traditional music of their region, including original works that speak to their experiences as Kentucky women. Creating the album will expand their reach and scope as musicians. The finished work will increase the visibility of women in traditional music as a way to inspire social change.
  • Tanya Torp (Lexington): $3,500 to attend writing classes and workshops and to develop a creative nonfiction instructional book raising awareness about subversive and effective community building strategies. Attending the workshops and classes will hone her skills as a writer in a new genre. The finished work will highlight the effectiveness of recurrent community gatherings for relationship building and community problem-solving, fostering hope in divisive times.
  • Tucky Williams (Lexington): $7,500 to create a second Daggar Kiss film, a fantasy adventure about two women from different worlds who fall in love. Creating the work will expand her reach to include a younger audience. The finished work will continue to spread the message of acceptance of lesbians and all women who love women romantically.
  • Lindsey Windland and Meg Wilson (Berea): $6,260 to purchase materials needed to create a series of tintype portraits, and to attend a workshop covering the wet plate collodion process. Attending the workshop and creating the work will enhance their skills in creating photographic portraits. The finished work will raise awareness about feminist change-makers in the Berea community and celebrate their accomplishments.
  • Whitney Withington (Big Hill): $3,000 create three artist books featuring vintage vernacular photography from Eastern Kentucky to reverse the trend of invisibility of African American women in Appalachian imagery and literature. The activities will strengthen her computer, design, and decoration skills. The finished work will create dialogue and challenge stereotypes about African Americans in the Appalachian region.

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    For Artist Enrichment awards from previous years, click here.

    For Art Meets Activism awards from previous years, click here.